Amazing French Onion Soup

This looks so good. Always a complete sucker for french onion soup, especially authentic. I’ll definitely give proper feedback on this once I have.

101 Things Every Cook Should Cook

French onion soup

This is one of the best soups I have ever made. Truly, it is tastiness in soup form. I made it using a recipe written in my notebook by a waitress in a café in Montmartre which had no amounts, cooking times or instructions. Just ingredients, and my memory of what it tasted like. So I made up how to make it, and it has worked an absolute treat.

The secret is a good stock. If at all possible, make your own stock. Chicken, vegetable or beef, whatever your preference. Mine was made with veal bones (happy, farmer’s market veal), which I roasted and then simmered with carrots, celery, a leek, an onion, some peppercorns and thyme and parsley for 6 hours. You can follow this basic method, but using roasted chicken, beef or veal bones. Ham stock wouldn’t really work here. Yes, I know making stock seems like…

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Creamy Honey, Mustard and Cider Pork

We tried this recipe tonight and found it top drawer. I should have been slightly more patient and allowed the cider to reduce a bit before adding the rest. It meant that a lot of time afterwards was spent reducing the sauce but it was definitely worth it. We enjoyed with rice noodles and sautéed spinach which worked a treat. Well done with this recipe 🙂

101 Things Every Cook Should Cook

Creamy honey, mustard and cider pork

This is very simple and ready in less than 15 minutes – a superquick and tasty midweek supper. Good flavours, and you can make it low-fat by using low-fat crème fraiche instead of cream. I actually prefer crème fraiche to ordinary cream anyway, it’s more zingy.

Ingredients
Serves 2

1 pork fillet (tenderloin)
½ a large onion or 1 small one
2tsp wholegrain mustard
2tsp honey
3 tablespoons crème fraiche (I use low-fat)
About 100ml dry cider
A knob of butter
salt and pepper to taste

The Cooking

First slice the tenderloin into medallions, about 1 or 2cm thick. Mix together the crème fraiche, mustard and honey in a bowl and set aside.

Put the butter in a frying pan and set it on a fairly high heat. Slice the onion finely and once the butter is frothing, add them to the pan. You’re not doing long, slow cooking here…

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Sunday roast -family time

This just came up in conversation in the Funtime foodie household. There is a come dine with me on the telly and one of the contestants entertained the others by cooking a Sunday roast and it felt a bit weird. We regularly have a Sunday roast, usually about once a week 🙂 and it’s a nice time for all of us to spend together. Sometimes, my mother in law who is close family to us invites us for one and it is a great occasion where we often are force fed too much wine and food and throughly enjoy the experience. The common denominator is family with the roast. I would actually find it strange and a slight violation to have a none family roast. There are so many environments you can enjoy with your friends, pub, evening meal invite, whatever you have fun doing during the day, but there is a side to me that feels the Sunday roast is a special time for a busy family to spend quality time together and the roast dinner symbolises this.

So, if ever you have an invite for a Sunday roast dinner, I reckon the person giving you the invite is paying the ultimate compliment about your relationship. They see you as family 🙂